Tom Lizak, K1TL

Tom is our newest Net Control.  He alternates Saturday with Jon, N1MLF.  Tom lives in Tiverton RI.

I have been a resident of Tiverton RI for 32 years and an avid amateur radio op for about 60 years.   Worked as a CW operator for RCA Global Communications from 1978-84 at their RCA Coastal Station WPA in Port Arthur TX.  This was the best job I ever had…working CW and getting paid for it.

I recently retired three years ago as an Electronic Technician with Purvis Systems working as a government contractor @ NUWC (Navy Undersea Warfare Center) in Newport/Middletown RI.  There I did a variety of jobs doing mostly fiber optic fabrication along with power cables, power racks, water cooled equipment, computer installation/repair work and supply work…so I was pretty busy most of the time.

Once retired, I looked into getting back to Meteorology as that was my passion when I was a teenager, listening to Don Kent CH4/WBZ in the early AM before going to school and the NEWN on 3.905MCs (MCs, back then). Purchased the Davis Vantage PRO2 set up and put the wind instruments on the 55 foot tower in the back and temp/rain equipment off the side deck.

Equipment is an Elecraft K3 w/KPA500 and a  Kenwood TS830S for backup.  I have a 80m inv-V off the tower.

TOM CARR, WA1KDD, ACHUSHNET MA

A colder and drier than normal July here in the northern part of Acushnet.  The July mean of 71.2 deg. was the coldest July since July 2009 saw a mean of 70.7 degrees.  The July low temp

readings of 51 deg. were the lowest in July since 2009 saw 49 deg..  July averages the driest month of any month at my location in the past 38 years.  My July total of 1.89″ holds up to its reputation.

Five of the last six Julys have been drier than normal.  Big savings on electric bills during this July with only 20 cooling degree days and 10 heating degrees days at my location.

July 2017 Acushnet, Mass.      41deg,44min N     70deg,55min W

Ave High     80.6 deg.  Ave Low     61.7 deg.  July Mean     71.2 deg. is 1.8 deg. below normal.  High Temp     91 deg. on July 20 & 21st.; Low Temp     51 deg. on July 26 & 31st. Days 90 or above      2

Total Precip.      1.89″ is 1.63″ below normal  Max 24 hr. Precip.    0.72″ on July 7th.  Total 2017 Precip.     31.47″ is 1.45″ above normal.  T-Storm Days  2 .  High Wind Gust  21 mph on July 1st.  Heating Degree Days 10 ; Cooling Degree Days   207

High Barometer     30.22″ on July 6 & 26th.  Low Barometer      29.64″ on July 7th.

WEB SITE ACTIVITY

I have three web sites, of which two are dedicated to weather:  www.capecodwx.com and www.newenglandweathernet.com.  I think you’ll be surprised at the activity there is on these web sites:

That’s right, an average of about 18,000 hits a day and close to 600,000 a month!  Peak Visits for the last year was 944 a day or over 28,000 a month (Nov 2016).

Measuring Heavy Rainfall

CoCoRahs (Community Collaborative for Rain, Hail and Snow) is a national network of weather observers just like our members.  Several of us are members of CoCoRahs.  If you’re not a member and can spare 10-15 seconds the morning before or after the Net, think about joining CoCoRaHS.  It’s free.

The link below is a cartoon that goes over the basics of measuring rain but it also has some suggestions for measuring very heavy rainfall, including one hint that I was unaware of!  If the inner cylinder of your raingauge is in place and the rain has overflowed into the outer cylinder you can estimate the amount in the outer gauge by seeing how high it is on the scale of the inner gauge.  Every 0.10 of the water mark on the inner gauge you will have approximately 1.00″ of water in the outer gauge.  Sound confusing?  Watch the cartoon.  If you don’t have a Stratus rain gauge, buy one!  It is the most accurate way of measuring precipitation.  They are available on the CoCoRaHS website for about $31.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3UZgy5R5jY&feature=youtu.be

Phil Bretz, KE2EA, Hornell NY

I received a telephone call yesterday from our old friend, Phil, KE2ea, long-time Net Control for the New England Weather Net on Mondays.  My wife and I had the pleasure of visiting with Phil and his wife back in 2014 on one of our trips to the West.

Phil’s wife passed on earlier this Summer after a serious heart attack.  Phil needed to discontinue his role with the NEWN because they had to move their bed downstairs where Phil’s radio was and his wife needed her sleep and could no longer climb stairs.

Our sympathy goes out to Phil and I encouraged him to think about becoming active again on the NEWN.  I told him that I would work on giving him back his roster number, #11, that he had for many years.